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SOMETHING TO TASTE
April 10, 2014 Adapted from The Artful Eater Cooks are frequently told to use imported European bay leaves — not the California ones. Credit: Kimberly Behr Cooks are frequently told to use imported European bay leaves — not the California ones. As Julia Child et al. gently advised in Mastering the Art of French Cooking, “American bay is stronger and a bit different in taste than European bay. We suggest you buy imported leaves.” In appearance, the dried leaves of one kind can’t be mistaken for the other. The California leaf is longer and has turned a deep green that is quite distinct from the light, dull gray green of the European.
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April 2, 2014 From The Art of Eating no. 91 Elisa Burlotto asked her father the Commendatore what he thought about her plan. There was a long pause and then his considered reply:  I see you are crazy like me. Credit: Vittore Alessandria Elisa Burlotto asked her father the Commendatore what he thought about her plan. There was a long pause and then his considered reply: “I see you are crazy like me.” It was the late 1960s, and the Burlotto family operated then, as it does today, the Castello di Verduno, a wine property in the hamlet of Verduno, population 400, in the Barolo zone of Piedmont in northwestern Italy. (The property also includes vineyards in Barbaresco.) Elisa had asked permission to plant a parcel of Verduno’s Massara vineyard to the local grape known as Pelaverga.
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March 20, 2014 Adapted from The Art of Eating no. 81 Pizza is everywhere, everyone likes it. It can hardly get more popular. Credit: Kimberly Behr Pizza is everywhere, everyone likes it. It can hardly get more popular. Across the United States, many non-chain pizzerie are now using carefully chosen ingredients and baking in wood-fired ovens, often aiming at the Neapolitan style and heading back to the roots in taste if not price. Some of the new places are pushing hard, although they don’t necessarily make clear what the ideal might be. And then there are a few interesting old places, above all in New Haven, where Sally’s and Pepe’s, followed by Modern, are famous — known for their coal-fired ovens and thin-crusted pizzas with more or less char.
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March 13, 2014 Adapted from The Art of Eating no. 75 By nature, bees collect nectar from a mix of flowers, but a careful beekeeper can, with some cooperation from nature, obtain a fairly pure single-flower honey by putting the colonies in the right place, supplying empty frames of comb as the flow from a certain flower begins, and then removing frames as they fill up. Credit: Naomi Bossom By nature, bees collect nectar from a mix of flowers, but a careful beekeeper can, with some cooperation from nature, obtain a fairly pure single-flower honey by putting the colonies in the right place, supplying empty frames of comb as the flow from a certain flower begins, and then removing frames as they fill up. Of the many honeys from the southeastern United States, three of the most typical and best are sourwood, produced especially in the Carolina mountains, gallberry, produced especially in southern Georgia, and tupelo, produced especially in northern Florida.
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